Interview Tips

Check out the interview tips video HERE!

 

THINK ABOUT WHAT QUESTIONS YOU'RE LIKELY TO BE ASKED

What relevant experience do you have?

What personal qualities do you think you can bring to the role?

What skills would make you good for the job?

In all cases, examples make your answers believable.

GO INTO DETAIL

Successful candidates almost always the ones that go into the most detail. Not only does it show that you’ve thought about the questions and the role in advance, it also gives the impression that you care and are making an effort

EXPLAIN WHY THINGS ARE RELEVANT

A bad answer says something like this: “I was a prefect at school and I had lots of responsibilities”. A good answer says: “I was a prefect at school, where I had to organise and implement a rota to make sure that events were run properly and to a particular budget. I delegated tasks to different members of my team, and so the Sports Day went very well. I had lots of good feedback from staff and parents. This taught me the importance of using all the members of a team, and the value of forward planning. I would use these skills as a Freshers’ rep.”

STATE THE OBVIOUS

Even if you think certain things go without saying, the candidate who actually says it gets more credit. For example: “Go and help the person being sick” is a much worse answer than “Go and see the person being sick. If necessary, put them in the recovery position, and call a member of Welfare. If you see someone with first aid training, ask them to help. If the person still feels ill, I would give them water. It might be appropriate to take them back to their room, if they prefer. Remember, you can’t be penalised for too much detail!

TALK US THROUGH YOUR THINKING

Sometimes explaining why you’re doing something is just as valuable as the thing itself. For example, when thinking about a scenario question, say what your priorities are: safety, or minimised risk, financial stability, whatever. You can also talk about delegating responsibility, and putting tasks in order of importance.

THINK BEFORE YOU SPEAK

Take a few seconds before you answer. Often people jump straight in without thinking about what the question is really about, or they answer a question that they were expecting – not the actual question!

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